Art Exhibits Not to Miss This Fall

  65 East 125th Street, Harlem , 1980. By Camilo José Vergara. Inkjet print. On loan at El Museo del Barrio’s  Down These Mean Streets: Community and Place in Urban Photography  exhibit.

65 East 125th Street, Harlem, 1980. By Camilo José Vergara. Inkjet print. On loan at El Museo del Barrio’s Down These Mean Streets: Community and Place in Urban Photography exhibit.

From the lights and train delays to the countless eccentric souls that you will cross in any given day, New York is a life force in itself, with the arts playing a vital key in it’s DNA. Stop by these key exhibitions before the year is over.

 
 Faith Ringgold (American, born 1930).  United States of Attica,  1972. Offset lithograph on papger, 21 3/4 x 27 1/2 in. (55.2 x 69.9 cm). 2018 Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York. 2018 Faith Ringgold, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Faith Ringgold (American, born 1930). United States of Attica, 1972. Offset lithograph on papger, 21 3/4 x 27 1/2 in. (55.2 x 69.9 cm). 2018 Courtesy ACA Galleries, New York. 2018 Faith Ringgold, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York.

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power

Where: Brooklyn Museum
When: September 14, 2018–February 3, 2019
Visit: Wednesdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays (11am-6pm), Thursdays (11am-10pm), and 11am-11pm for the First Saturday of the Month. CLOSED Monday & Tuesday.
Price: Adults ($16), Students with valid IDs, Adults 65+, Visitors with Disabilities ($10), 19 years old and under and Members (Free)

Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power showacases Black artistic practice from 1963 to 1983,” one of the most politically, socially, and aesthetically revolutionary periods in American history.” The exhibit is home to over 150 artworks, many of which directly address the unjust social conditions facing Black Americans. Soul of a Nation: Art in the Age of Black Power is organized by Tate Modern in collaboration with the Brooklyn Museum and Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, Arkansas, and The Broad, Los Angeles, and curated by Mark Godfrey, Senior Curator, International Art, and Zoe Whitley, Curator, International Art, Tate Modern. The Brooklyn Museum presentation is curated by Ashley James, Assistant Curator, Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum.

brooklynmuseum.org

 Jacob A. Riis,  An Italian Home under a Dump , c. 1890. Museum of the City of New York, Jacob A. Riis Collection, 90.13.1.208

Jacob A. Riis, An Italian Home under a Dump, c. 1890. Museum of the City of New York, Jacob A. Riis Collection, 90.13.1.208

Germ City: Microbes and the Metropolis

Where: Museum of the City of New York
When: Now until April 28th, 2019
Visit: Open daily from 10am-6pm
Price: Adults (Suggested Admission, $18), Seniors 65+ and Students ($12), Under the age of 20 and Members (Free)

This exhibit is a fascinating look at New York City's battle against infectious disease. Germ City: Microbes and the Metropolis explores the complex story of New York’s long battle against infectious disease—a fight involving government, urban planners, medical professionals, businesses, and activists. It reveals how our understanding of disease has changed us physically, socially, and culturally, and the surprising interplay between people and pathogens in an urban context. This exhibition is organized by the Museum of the City of New York in collaboration with The New York Academy of Medicine and Wellcome. It is part of Wellcome’s international project Contagious Cities, which explores the interplay of people and pathogens in urban contexts. Don’t miss the Museum of the City of New York’s other awesome exhibitions.

mcny.org

 Peter Saul – Government of California. Photograph: Courtesy of Mary Boone Gallery, New York

Peter Saul – Government of California. Photograph: Courtesy of Mary Boone Gallery, New York

Everything is Connected: Art and Conspiracy

Where: The Met Breuer, Lenox Hill
When: September 18th - January 6th, 2019
Visit: Tuesday–Thursday (10am–5:30pm), Friday & Saturday (10am–9pm), Sunday (10am–5:30pm). CLOSED Mondays.
Price: Adults ($25), Seniors ($17), Students ($12), Members and children under 12 (Free).

Everything Is Connected: Art and Conspiracy is the first major exhibition to tackle the hidden operations of power and suspicion between the government and its citizens that haunts Western democracies. The first half of the exhibition comprises works by artists who hew strictly to the public record while the second part dives into fantastical works that nevertheless uncover uncomfortable truths in an age of information overload and weakened trust in institutions. Featuring 70 works by 30 artists in media ranging from painting and sculpture to photography, video, and installation art, from 1969 to 2016, Everything Is Connected: Art and Conspiracy presents an alternate history of postwar and contemporary art that is also an archaeology of our troubled times.

www.metmuseum.org/

 Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol,  Paramount , 1984–85.

Jean-Michel Basquiat and Andy Warhol, Paramount, 1984–85.

Andy Warhol: From A to B and Back Again

Where: The Whitney
When: November 12th, 2018 - March 31st, 2019
Visit: Monday - Thursday, Sunday (10:30am-6pm), Friday & Saturday (10:30am-10pm)
Price: Adults ($25), Senior, Students, and Visitors with Disabilities ($18), 18 and Under and Members (Free).

This exhibition—the first Andy Warhol retrospective organized by a U.S. institution since 1989—reconsiders the work of one of the most inventive, influential, and important American artists. Building on a wealth of new materials, research and scholarship that has emerged since the artist’s untimely death in 1987, this exhibition reveals new complexities about the Warhol we think we know, and introduces a Warhol for the 21st century.

www.whitney.org

  “Soldier in Union uniform with wife and two daughter.”  Library of Congress, African American Photographs Assembled for 1900 Paris Exposition

“Soldier in Union uniform with wife and two daughter.” Library of Congress, African American Photographs Assembled for 1900 Paris Exposition

Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow

Where: New York Historical Society
When: September 7th, 2018 - March 3rd, 2019
Visit: Tuesday - Thursday, Saturday (10am-6pm), friday (10am-9pm), Sunday (10am-5pm). CLOSED Mondays.
Price: Adults ($21), Seniors, Educators, Active Military ($16), Students ($13), Kids 5-13yo ($6), Kids 4yo and under (Free).

Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow explores the struggle for full citizenship and racial equality that unfolded in the 50 years after the Civil War. When slavery ended in 1865, a period of Reconstruction began and by 1868, all persons born in the United States were citizens and equal under the law. But efforts to create an interracial democracy were contested from the start. A harsh backlash ensued, ushering in a half century of the “separate but equal” age of Jim Crow. Having opened to mark the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, the exhibition is organized chronologically from the end of the Civil War to the end of WWI and highlights the central role played by African Americans in advocating for their rights. Lead support for Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow provided by National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor. Major support provided by the Ford Foundation, the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, Crystal McCrary and Raymond J. McGuire, and Agnes Gund. Also be sure to catch the Harry Potter exhibition Harry Potter: A History of Magic and Betye Saar'‘s Keepin’ It Clean.

www.nyhistory.org

  My Playground , 1980. Perla de Leon. Gelatin silver print

My Playground, 1980. Perla de Leon. Gelatin silver print

Down These Mean Streets: Community and Place in Urban Photography

Where: El Museo del Barrio
When: September 13th, 2018 - January 6th, 2019
Visit: Wednesday - Saturday (11am-6pm), Sunday (12pm-5pm). CLOSED Monday & Tuesday
Price: Adults (Suggested admission $9), Students & Seniors ($5), Members, Children under 12 (Free). Free for Seniors on Wednesdays.

The exhibition explores the work of ten photographers. Rather than approach the neighborhoods as detached observers, these artists deeply identified with their subject. The photographers include activist and documentary photographer Frank Espada, Hiram Maristany and Winston of New York City, Vargas Oscar Castillo of L.A., Perla de Leon who captured the South Bronx, John Valadez’s vivid portraits of East L.A., Camilo José Vergara and Anthony Hernandez, Ruben Ochoa, and Manuel Acevedo.

www.elmuseo.org

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Art of Native America

Where: The Met, Fifth Avenue
When: October 4th, 2018 - October 6th, 2019
Visit: Sunday – Thursday (10am–5:30pm), Friday & Saturday (10am–9pm)
Price: Adults ($21), Seniors, Educators, Active Military ($16), Students ($13), Kids 5-13yo ($6), Kids 4yo and under (Free).

This outstanding exhibition in the Museum's American Wing showcases 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Walton Family Foundation.

www.metmuseum.org

Djali Brown-Cepeda